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Alcaftadine

Mechanism of Action

Alcaftadine is an H1 histamine receptor antagonist and inhibitor of the release of histamine from mast cells. Decreased chemotaxis and inhibition of eosinophil activation has also been demonstrated.

Pharmacokinetic Properties

Absorption

Following bilateral topical ocular administration of alcaftadine ophthalmic solution, 0.25%, the mean plasma Cmax of alcaftadine was approximately 60 pg/mL and the median Tmax occurred at 15 minutes. Plasma concentrations of alcaftadine were below the lower limit of quantification (10 pg/mL) by 3 hours after dosing. The mean Cmax of the active carboxylic acid metabolite was approximately 3 ng/mL and occurred at 1 hour after dosing. Plasma concentrations of the carboxylic acid metabolite were below the lower limit of quantification (100 pg/mL) by 12 hours after dosing. There was no indication of systemic accumulation or changes in plasma exposure of alcaftadine or the active metabolite following daily topical ocular administration.

Distribution

The protein binding of alcaftadine and the active metabolite are 39.2% and 62.7%, respectively.

Elimination

Metabolism

The metabolism of alcaftadine is mediated by non-CYP450 cytosolic enzymes to the active carboxylic acid metabolite. In vitro studies showed that neither alcaftadine nor the carboxylic acid metabolite substantially inhibited reactions catalyzed by major CYP450 enzymes.

Excretion

The elimination half-life of the carboxylic acid metabolite is approximately 2 hours following topical ocular administration. Based on data following oral administration of alcaftadine, the carboxylic acid metabolite is primarily eliminated unchanged in the urine.

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